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Gold Investment Updates are weekly gold investment newsletter provided by Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA. They are based on the flagship Gold & Silver Trading Alerts that focus on all the key factors that govern long- and medium-term outlooks for gold, silver, and mining stocks. These comprehensive reports (usually size of a small ebook) ensure that you’re kept up-to-date on important developments that 99%+ of investors are likely to miss.

  • Gold Investment Update: How Do You Get Inflation Under Control?

    September 23, 2021, 10:48 AM

    Raise the dollar, drop the metals. Under most possible scenarios, things don’t look good for gold, silver, and mining stocks – for the medium-term.

    With the USD Index and U.S. Treasury yields the main fundamental drivers of the PMs’ performance, some confusion has arisen due to their parallel and divergent moves. For example, sometimes the USD Index rises while U.S. Treasury yields fall, or vice-versa, and sometimes the pair move higher/lower in unison. However, it’s important to remember that different economic environments have different impacts on the USD Index and U.S. Treasury yields.

    To explain, the USD Index benefits from both the safe-haven bid (stock market volatility) and economic outperformance relative to its FX peers. Conversely, U.S. Treasury yields only benefit from the latter. Thus, when economic risks intensify (like what we witnessed with Evergrande on Sep. 20), the USD Index often rallies while U.S. Treasury yields often fall. Thus, the economic climate is often the fundamental determinant of the pairs’ future paths.

    For context, I wrote on Apr.16:

    The PMs suffer during three of four possible scenarios:

    1. When the bond market and the stock market price in risk, it’s bearish for the PMs
    2. When the bond market and the stock market don’t price in risk, it’s bearish for the PMs
    3. When the bond market doesn’t price in risk, but the stock market does, it’s bearish for the PMs
    4. When the bond market prices in risk and the stock market doesn’t, it’s bullish for the PMs

    Regarding scenario #1, when the bond market and the stock market price in risk (economic stress), the USD Index often rallies and its strong negative correlation with the PMs upends their performance. Regarding scenario #2, when the bond market and the stock market don’t price in risk, U.S. economic strength supports a stronger U.S. dollar and rising U.S, Treasury yields reduce the fundamental attractiveness of gold. For context, the PMs are non-yielding assets, and when interest rates rise, bonds become more attractive relative to gold (for some investors). Regarding scenario #3, when the stock market suffers and U.S. Treasury yields are indifferent, the usual uptick in the USD Index is a bearish development for the PMs (for the same reasons outlined in scenario #1). Regarding scenario #4, when the bond market prices in risk (lower yields) and the stock market doesn’t, inflation-adjusted (real) interest rates often decline, and risk-on sentiment can hurt the USD Index. As a result, the cocktail often uplifts the PMs due to lower real interest rates and a weaker U.S. dollar.

    The bottom line? The USD Index and U.S. Treasury yields can move in the same direction or forge different paths. However, while a stock market crash is likely the most bearish fundamental outcome that could confront the PMs, scenario #2 is next in line. While it may (or may not) seem counterintuitive, a strong U.S. economy is bearish for the PMs. When U.S. economic strength provides a fundamental thesis for both the USD Index and U.S. Treasury yields to rise (along with real interest rates), the double-edged sword often leaves gold and silver with deep lacerations.

    In the meantime, though, with investors eagerly awaiting the Fed’s monetary policy decision today, QE is already dying a slow death. Case in point: not only has the USD Index recaptured 93 and surged above the neckline of its inverse (bullish) head & shoulders pattern, but the greenback’s fundamentals remain robust. With 78 counterparties draining more than $1.240 trillion out of the U.S. financial system on Sep. 21, the Fed’s daily reverse repurchase agreements hit another all-time high.

    Please see below:

    Graphical user interfaceDescription automatically generatedSource: New York Fed

    To explain, a reverse repurchase agreement (repo) occurs when an institution offloads cash to the Fed in exchange for a Treasury security (on an overnight or short-term basis). And with U.S. financial institutions currently flooded with excess liquidity, they’re shipping cash to the Fed at an alarming rate. And while I’ve been warning for months that the activity is the fundamental equivalent of a taper – due to the lower supply of U.S. dollars (which is bullish for the USD Index) – the psychological effect is not the same. However, as we await a formal taper announcement from the Fed, the U.S. dollar’s fundamental foundation remains quite strong.

    Furthermore, with the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) publishing a rather cryptic article on Sep. 10 titled “Fed Officials Prepare for November Reduction in Bond Buying,” messaging from the central bank’s unofficial mouthpiece implies that something is brewing. And while the Delta variant and Evergrande provide the Fed with an excuse to elongate its taper timeline, surging inflation has the Fed increasingly handcuffed.

    As a result, Goldman Sachs Chief U.S. Economist David Mericle expects the Fed to provide “advance notice” today and set the stage for an official taper announcement in November. He wrote:

    While the start date now appears set, the pace of tapering is an open question. Our standing forecast is that the FOMC will taper at a pace of $15bn per meeting, split between $10bn in UST and $5bn in MBS, ending in September 2022. But a number of FOMC participants have called instead for a faster pace that would end by mid-2022, and we now see $15bn per meeting vs. $15bn per month as a close call.”

    On top of that, with stagflation bubbling beneath the surface, another hawkish shift could materialize.

    To explain, I wrote on Jun. 17:

    On Apr. 30, I warned that Jerome Powell, Chairman of the U.S. Federal Reserve (Fed), was materially behind the inflation curve.

    I wrote:

    With Powell changing his tune from not seeing any “unwelcome” inflation on Jan. 14 to “we are likely to see upward pressure on prices, but [it] will be temporary” on Apr. 28, can you guess where this story is headed next?

    And with the Fed Chair revealing on Jun. 16 what many of us already knew, he conceded:

    TextDescription automatically generatedSource: CNBC

    Moreover, while Powell added that “our expectation is these high inflation readings now will abate,” he also conceded that “you can think of this meeting that we had as the ‘talking about talking about’ [tapering] meeting, if you’d like.”

    However, because actions speak louder than words, notice the monumental shift below?

    TableDescription automatically generatedSource: U.S. Fed

    To explain, if you analyze the red box, you can see that the Fed increased its 2021 Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE) Index projection from a 2.4% year-over-year (YoY) rise to a 3.4% YoY rise. But even more revealing, the original projection was made only three months ago. Thus, the about face screams of inflationary anxiety.

    What’s more, I highlighted on Aug. 5 that the hawkish upward revision increased investors’ fears of a faster rate-hike cycle and contributed to the rise in the USD Index and the fall in the GDXJ ETF (our short position).

    Please see below:

    Chart, line chart, histogramDescription automatically generated

    And why is all of this so important? Well, with Mericle expecting the Fed to increase its 2021 PCE Index projection from 3.4% to 4.3% today (the red box below), if the Fed’s message shifts from we’re adamant that inflation is “transitory” to “suddenly, we’re not so sure,” a re-enactment of the June FOMC meeting could uplift the USD Index and upend the PMs once again. For context, the FOMC’s July meeting did not include a summary of its economic projections and today’s ‘dot plot’ will provide the most important clues.

    Please see below:

    TableDescription automatically generated

    Finally, with CNBC proclaiming on Sep. 21 that the Fed is “widely expected to indicate it is getting ready to announce it will start paring back its $120 billion in monthly purchases of Treasuries and mortgage-backed securities,” even the financial media expects some form of “advance notice.”

    A picture containing text, bottle, darkDescription automatically generatedSource: CNBC

    The bottom line? While the Delta variant and Evergrande have provided the Fed with dovish cover, neither addresses the underlying problem. With inflation surging and the Fed’s 2% annual target looking more and more like wishful thinking, reducing its bond-buying program, increasing the value of the U.S. dollar, and decreasing commodity prices is the only way to get inflation under control. In absence, the Producer Price Index (PPI) will likely continue its upward momentum and the cost-push inflationary spiral will likely continue as well.

    In conclusion, the gold miners underperformed gold once again on Sep. 21 and the relative weakness is profoundly bearish. Moreover, while the USD Index was roughly flat, Treasury yields rallied across the curve. And while Powell will do his best to thread the dovish needle today, he’s stuck between a rock and a hard place: if he talks down the U.S. dollar (like he normally does), commodity prices will likely rise, and inflation will likely remain elevated. If he acknowledges reality and prioritizes controlling inflation, the U.S. dollar will likely surge, and the general stock market should suffer. As a result, with the conundrum poised to come to a head over the next few months (maybe even today), the PMs are caught in the crossfire and lower lows will likely materialize over the medium term.

    Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of the full analyses that our subscribers enjoy on a regular basis. They include multiple premium details such as the interim target for gold that could be reached in the next few weeks. We invite you to subscribe now and read today’s issue right away.

    Sincerely,
    Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA
    Founder, Editor-in-chief

  • Gold Investment Update: USD Bears Are Fresh Out of Honey Pots

    September 20, 2021, 1:47 PM

    The declining medium-term outlook for gold, silver, and mining stocks will eat away at the honey pot of US dollar bears. Get ready for bee stings.

    With headline after headline attempting to knock the USD Index off of its lofty perch, I warned on Sep. 13 that dollar bears will likely run out of honey sooner rather than later.

    I wrote:

    While the USD Index was under fundamental fire in recent weeks, buyers eagerly hit the bid near the 38.2% Fibonacci retracement level. And after positive sentiment lifted the greenback back above the neckline of its inverse (bullish) head & shoulders pattern last week, the USDX’s medium-term outlook remains profoundly bullish.

    More importantly, though, after the USD Index rallied by 0.63% last week and further validated its bullish breakout, gold, silver, and mining stocks ran in the opposite direction. And with the divergence likely to accelerate over the medium term, the swarm should sting the precious metals during the autumn months.

    Please see below:

    ChartDescription automatically generated

    Conversely, if the USD Index encounters resistance as it attempts to make a new 2021 high, gold, silver, and mining stocks could enjoy an immaterial corrective upswing. However, the optimism will likely be short lived, and it’s likely a matter of when, not if, the USD Index reaches the illustrious milestone.

    Equally bullish for the greenback, with the USD Index’s technical strength signaling an ominous ending for the Euro Index, I warned on Sep. 13 that the latter faced a tough road ahead.

    I wrote:

    While I have less conviction in the Euro Index’s next move relative to the USD Index, more likely than not, the Euro Index should break down once again and the bearish momentum should resume over the medium term.

    And after the Euro Index sunk below the neckline of its bearish head & shoulders pattern last week, lower lows remains the most likely outcome over the medium term.

    Please see below:

    Chart, line chartDescription automatically generated

    Adding to our confidence (don’t get me wrong, there are no certainties in any market; it’s just that the bullish narrative for the USDX is even more bullish in my view), the USD Index often sizzles in the summer sun and major USDX rallies often start during the middle of the year. Summertime spikes have been mainstays on the USD Index’s historical record and in 2004, 2005, 2008, 2011, 2014 and 2018 a retest of the lows (or close to them) occurred before the USD Index began its upward flights (which is exactly what’s happened this time around).

    Furthermore, profound rallies (marked by the red vertical dashed lines below) followed in 2008, 2011 and 2014. With the current situation mirroring the latter, a small consolidation on the long-term chart is exactly what occurred before the USD Index surged in 2014. Likewise, the USD Index recently bottomed near its 50-week moving average; an identical development occurred in 2014. More importantly, though, with bottoms in the precious metals market often occurring when gold trades in unison with the USD Index (after ceasing to respond to the USD’s rallies with declines), we’re still far away from that milestone in terms of both price and duration.

    Moreover, as the journey unfolds, the bullish signals from 2014 have resurfaced once again. For example, the USD Index’s RSI is hovering near a similar level (marked with red ellipses), and back then, a corrective downswing also occurred at the previous highs. More importantly, though, the short-term weakness was followed by a profound rally in 2014, and many technical and fundamental indicators signal that another reenactment could be forthcoming.

    Please see below:

    ChartDescription automatically generated

    Just as the USD Index took a breather before its massive rally in 2014, it seems that we saw the same recently. This means that predicting higher gold prices (or the ones of silver) here is likely not a good idea.

    Continuing the theme, the eye in the sky doesn’t lie. And with the USDX’s long-term breakout clearly visible, the wind still remains at the greenback’s back.

    Please see below:

    ChartDescription automatically generated

    The bottom line?

    Once the momentum unfolds, ~94.5 is likely the USD Index’s first stop, ~98 is likely the next stop after that, and the USDX will likely exceed 100 at some point over the medium or long term. Keep in mind though: we’re not bullish on the greenback because of the U.S.’ absolute outperformance. It’s because the region is fundamentally outperforming the Eurozone, the EUR/USD accounts for nearly 58% of the movement of the USD Index, and the relative performance is what really matters.

    In conclusion, the USD Index’s sweet performance left sour tastes in the precious metals’ mouths. And with the former’s bullish breakout signaling an ominous future for the latter, gold, silver, and mining stocks will likely confront new lows over the medium term. However, once the autumn months fade and the winter weather approaches, buying opportunities may present themselves. And with unprecedented monetary and fiscal policy likely to underwrite new highs in the coming years, the long-term outlook for gold, silver, and mining stocks remains extremely bright.

    Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of the full analyses that our subscribers enjoy on a regular basis. They include multiple premium details such as the interim target for gold that could be reached in the next few weeks. We invite you to subscribe now and read today’s issue right away.

    Sincerely,
    Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA
    Founder, Editor-in-chief

  • Gold Investment Update: Gold Miners - Last of the Summer Wine

    September 13, 2021, 9:51 AM

    Autumn is just around the corner, and while the precious metals tasted some success most recently, the medium-term is still set for a downtrend.

    With Fed Chairman Jerome Powell sticking to his dovish guns and U.S. nonfarm payrolls elongating the central bank’s perceived taper timeline, gold, silver, and mining stocks were extremely happy campers. However, with event-driven rallies much more semblance than substance, I warned on Sep. 7 that the rollercoaster of emotions would likely end in tears.

    I wrote:

    With the 2013 analogue leading the gold miners down an ominous path, the HUI Index and the GDX ETF have rallied by roughly 8% off their recent lows. However, identical developments occurred in 2013, and neither bout of optimism invalided their bearish medium-term outlooks.

    And after the GDX ETF and the GDXJ ETF (our profitable short position) plunged by 5.35% and 6.98% respectively last week, summertime sadness confronted the precious metals. Likewise, with more melancholy moves likely to materialize over the medium term, gold, silver, and mining stocks should hit lower lows during the autumn months.

    To explain, the HUI Index also plunged by nearly 6% last week, and the reversal of the previous corrective upswing mirrors its behavior from 2013. In addition, with its stochastic oscillator and its RSI (Relative Strength Index) also a spitting image, an ominous re-enactment of 2013 implies significantly lower prices over the medium term.

    Please see below:

    ChartDescription automatically generated with medium confidence

    What’s more, the vertical, dashed lines above demonstrate how the HUI Index is following its 2012-2013 playbook. For example, after a slight buy signal from the stochastic indicator in 2012, the short-term pause was followed by another sharp drawdown. For context, after the HUI Index recorded a short-term buy signal in late 2012 – when the index’s stochastic indicator was already below the 20 level (around 10) and the index was in the process of forming the right shoulder of a huge, medium-term head-and-shoulders pattern – the index moved slightly higher, consolidated, and then fell off a cliff. Thus, the HUI Index is quite likely to decline to its 200-week moving average (or so) before pausing and recording a corrective upswing. That’s close to the 220 level. Thereafter, the index will likely continue its bearish journey and record a final medium-term low some time in December.

    Furthermore, I warned previously that the miners’ drastic underperformance of gold was an extremely bearish sign. There were several weeks when gold rallied visibly and the HUI Index actually declined modestly. And now, gold stocks are trading close to their previous 2021 lows, while gold is almost right in the middle between its yearly high and its yearly low.

    And why is this so important? Well, because the bearish implications of gold stocks’ extreme underperformance still remain intact.

    Let’s keep in mind that the drastic underperformance of the HUI Index also preceded the bloodbath in 2008 as well as in 2012 and 2013. To explain, right before the huge slide in late September and early October 2008, gold was still moving to new intraday highs; the HUI Index was ignoring that, and then it declined despite gold’s rally. However, it was also the case that the general stock market suffered materially. If stocks didn’t decline so profoundly back then, gold stocks’ underperformance relative to gold would have likely been present but more moderate.

    Nonetheless, broad head & shoulders patterns have often been precursors to monumental collapses. For example, when the HUI Index retraced a bit more than 61.8% of its downswing in 2008 and in between 50% and 61.8% of its downswing in 2012 before eventually rolling over, in both (2008 and 2012) cases, the final top – the right shoulder – formed close to the price where the left shoulder topped. And in early 2020, the left shoulder topped at 303.02. Thus, three of the biggest declines in the gold mining stocks (I’m using the HUI Index as a proxy here) all started with broad, multi-month head-and-shoulders patterns. And in all three cases, the size of the declines exceeded the size of the head of the pattern. As a reminder, the HUI Index recently completed the same formation.

    Yes, the HUI Index moved back below the previous lows and the neck level of the formation, which – at face value – means that the formation was invalidated, but we saw a similar “invalidation” in 2000 and in 2013. And then, the decline followed anyway. Consequently, I don’t think that taking the recent move higher at its face value is appropriate. It seems to me that the analogies to the very similar situation from the past are more important.

    As a result, we’re confronted with two bearish scenarios:

    1. If things develop as they did in 2000 and 2012-2013, gold stocks are likely to bottom close to their early-2020 low.
    2. If things develop like in 2008 (which might be the case, given the extremely high participation of the investment public in the stock market and other markets), gold stocks could re-test (or break slightly below) their 2016 low.

    In both cases, the forecast for silver, gold, and mining stocks is extremely bearish for the next several months.

    For even more confirmation, let’s compare the behavior of the GDX ETF and the GDXJ ETF. Regarding the former, investors rejected the senior miners (GDX) attempt to recapture their 50-day moving average and the failure was perfectly in tune with what I wrote on Sep. 7:

    Large spikes in daily volume are often bearish, not bullish. To explain, three of the last four volume outliers preceded an immediate top (or near) for the GDX ETF, while the one that preceded the late July rally was soon followed by the GDX ETF’s 2020 peak. Thus, when investors go ‘all in,’ material declines often follow. And with that, spike-high volume during the GDX ETF’s upswings often presents us with great shorting opportunities.

    Please see below:

    ChartDescription automatically generated

    Even more bearish, not only did last week’s plunge usher the GDX ETF back below the neckline of its bearish head & shoulders pattern (the horizontal red line on the right side of the chart above), but the sell signal from the stochastic oscillator remains firmly intact. As a result, ominous clouds continue to form.

    And with the GDXJ ETF stuck in a similar rut, I wrote on Sep. 7 that overzealous investors would likely end the week disappointed:

    With the current move quite similar to the corrective upswing recorded in mid-May, the springtime bounce was also followed by a sharp drawdown. As a result, the GDXJ ETF could be near its precipice, as its 50-day moving average is right ahead. And with the key level now acting as resistance, investors’ rejection on Sep. 3 could indicate that the top is already here.

    Moreover, while the junior miners followed the roadmap to perfection, the GDXJ ETF still remains ripe for lower lows over the medium term.

    Please see below:

    ChartDescription automatically generated

    Finally, while I’ve been warning for months that the GDXJ/GDX ratio was destined for devaluation, after another sharp move lower last week, the downtrend remains intact. For example, when the ratio’s RSI jumped above 50 three times in 2021, it coincided with short-term peaks in gold. Second, the trend in the ratio this year has been clearly down, and there’s no sign of a reversal, especially when you consider that the ratio broke below its 2019 support (which served as resistance in mid-2020). When the same thing happened in 2020, the ratio then spiked even below 1.

    More importantly, though, with the relative weakness likely to persist, the profits from our short position in the GDXJ ETF should accelerate during the autumn months.

    ChartDescription automatically generated

    The bottom line?

    If the ratio is likely to continue its decline, then on a short-term basis we can expect it to decline to 1.27 or so. If the general stock market plunges, the ratio could move even lower, but let’s assume that stocks decline moderately (just as they did in the last couple of days) or that they do nothing or rally slightly. They’ve done all the above recently, so it’s natural to expect that this will be the case. Consequently, the trend in the GDXJ to GDX ratio would also be likely to continue, and thus expecting a move to about 1.26 - 1.27 seems rational.

    If the GDX is about to decline to approximately $28 before correcting, then we might expect the GDXJ to decline to about $28 x 1.27 = $35.56 or $28 x 1.26 = $35.28. In other words, $28 in the GDX is likely to correspond to about $35 in the GDXJ.

    Is there any technical support around $35 that would be likely to stop the decline? Yes. It’s provided by the late-Feb. 2020 low ($34.70) and the late-March high ($34.84). There’s also the late-April low at $35.63. Conservatively, I’m going to place the profit-take level just above the latter.

    Consequently, it seems that expecting the GDXJ to decline to about $35 is justified from the technical point of view as well.

    In conclusion, gold, silver, and mining stocks went from delighted to despondent, as the technical downpour continues to rain on their parade. And while a major buying opportunity may present itself in December, the next few months will likely elicit more tears than cheers. As a result, while we eagerly await the opportunity to go long the precious metals and participate in their secular uptrends, bearish breakdowns, stock market struggles, and the Fed’s taper timeline will likely dampen their moods over the medium term.

    Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of the full analyses that our subscribers enjoy on a regular basis. They include multiple premium details such as the interim target for gold that could be reached in the next few weeks. We invite you to subscribe now and read today’s issue right away.

    Sincerely,
    Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA
    Founder, Editor-in-chief

  • Gold Investment Update: Dovish Assassins of the USD Index

    September 7, 2021, 8:52 AM

    “I’ve got you in my sights” – the USDX heard that a lot over the last two weeks. While it was bullish for gold, the dollar might take revenge soon.

    With Fed Chairman Jerome Powell doubling down on his dovish dialogue on Aug. 27 and the Delta variant depressing U.S. nonfarm payrolls on Sep. 3, the stars aligned for a profound decline in the USD Index. However, while the greenback came under fire from all angles, the USD Index demonstrated immense resiliency in the face of adversity. Moreover, the bullish determination helped reinforce our expectation for another move higher over the medium term.

    To explain, the USD Index suffered a breakdown below the neckline of its inverse (bullish) head & shoulders pattern on Sep. 3 (following the release of the payrolls). However, once cooler heads prevailed, the dollar basket recouped the key level during futures trading on Sep. 5/6/7. As a result, U.S. dollar sentiment still remains quite elevated, and at the moment of writing these words, the USD Index is trading back (not much but still) above the neck level of the pattern (dashed, thick line) that’s based on the closing prices.

    Please see below:

    No Pain, No Gain

    Furthermore, with the USD Index’s pain the Euro Index’s gain, the latter invalidated the breakdown below the neckline of its bearish H&S pattern. For context, the EUR/USD accounts for nearly 58% of the movement of the USD Index. And while the uprising is bad news for the greenback, could the Euro Index actually prolong gold, silver, and mining stocks’ party?

    Well, for one, if I was trading the EUR/USD pair, I would be concerned about any short position that I might possibly have in this currency pair, and I could even close it based on this invalidation alone.

    However, I’m not concerned about our short position in the junior miners at all because of the invalidation in the Euro Index. Why? Because of the situation in the USD Index and – most importantly – because of the way the mining stocks refuse to react to the USDX’s weakness right now. Thus, while the situation is worth monitoring, it’s unlikely to move the needle over the medium term.

    Please see below:

    What a Scorching Heat!

    Adding to our confidence, the USD Index often sizzles in the summer sun and major USDX rallies often start during the middle of the year. Summertime spikes have been mainstays on the USD Index’s historical record and in 2004, 2005, 2008, 2011, 2014 and 2018 a retest of the lows (or close to them) occurred before the USD Index began its upward flights (which is exactly what’s happened this time around).

    Furthermore, profound rallies (marked by the red vertical dashed lines below) followed in 2008, 2011 and 2014. With the current situation mirroring the latter, a small consolidation on the long-term chart is exactly what occurred before the USD Index surged in 2014. Likewise, the USD Index recently bottomed near its 50-week moving average; an identical development occurred in 2014. More importantly, though, with bottoms in the precious metals market often occurring when gold trades in unison with the USD Index (after ceasing to respond to the USD’s rallies with declines), we’re still far away from that milestone in terms of both price and duration.

    Moreover, as the journey unfolds, the bullish signals from 2014 have resurfaced once again. For example, the USD Index’s RSI is hovering near a similar level (marked with red ellipses), and back then, a corrective downswing also occurred at the previous highs. More importantly, though, the short-term weakness was followed by a profound rally in 2014, and many technical and fundamental indicators signal that another reenactment could be forthcoming.

    Please see below:

    Just as the USD Index took a breather before its massive rally in 2014, it seems that we saw the same recently. This means that predicting higher gold prices (or the ones of silver)here is likely not a good idea.

    Continuing the theme, the eye in the sky doesn’t lie. And with the USDX’s long-term breakout clearly visible, the wind still remains at the greenback’s back.

    Please see below:

    The bottom line?

    Once the momentum unfolds, ~94.5 is likely the USD Index’s first stop, ~98 is likely the next stop, and the USDX will likely exceed 100 at some point over the medium or long term. Keep in mind though: we’re not bullish on the greenback because of the U.S.’ absolute outperformance. It’s because the region is fundamentally outperforming the Eurozone, the EUR/USD accounts for nearly 58% of the movement of the USD Index, and the relative performance is what really matters.

    In conclusion, the USD Index was a marked man over the last two weeks, and the dovish assassins had the dollar basket right in their crosshairs. And while the barrage of bullets fired at the greenback was bullish for gold, silver and mining stocks, the former’s ability to escape the infirmary highlights the shift in sentiment surrounding the USD Index. As a result, with technicals, fundamentals and sentiment supporting a stronger U.S. dollar over the medium term, the precious metals won the recent very short-term battle, but they’re still unlikely to win the medium-term war. Of course, I continue to think that gold is going to soar in the following years, but not before declining profoundly first. At the moment of writing these words, gold futures are already down over $15 from their Friday’s close and about $20 below their last week’s high – it could be the case that the news-based rally is already over.

    Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of the full analyses that our subscribers enjoy on a regular basis. They include multiple premium details such as the interim target for gold that could be reached in the next few weeks. We invite you to subscribe now and read today’s issue right away.

    Sincerely,
    Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA
    Founder, Editor-in-chief

  • Gold Investment Update: Bittersweet Truth for Gold Stocks – What You Need to Know

    August 30, 2021, 9:19 AM

    When the Fed entices grown up kids with sweet words, they hit the candy store and stock up on gold, silver, and stocks. A sugar hangover follows.

    Beware of the candyman!

    With Fed Chairman Jerome Powell performing his usual dovish dance on Aug. 27, gold, silver, and mining stocks were like kids in a candy store. However, with the short-term sugar highs often leaving investors with nasty stomach aches, the sweet-and-sour nature of the precious metals’ performances may lead to pre-Halloween hangovers.

    HUI Index: Harbinger of Things to Come

    To explain, while the HUI Index invalidated the breakdown below its previous lows, the bullish reversal may seem quite sanguine. However, an identical development occurred in 2013 right before the index continued its sharp decline. Moreover, I warned previously that the HUI Index could record a corrective upswing of 4% to 8% (that’s what happened after the breakdown in 2013) and that it would not change the medium-term implications. And after the index rallied by more than 6% last week, the bounce is nothing to write home about.

    Furthermore, after recording a similar breakdown below the neckline of its bearish H&S pattern in 2000, a short-term corrective upswing followed before the HUI Index resumed its swift decline. As a result, gold, silver, and mining stocks may not behave like Jolly Ranchers for much longer.

    Please see below:

    What’s more, the vertical, dashed lines above demonstrate how the HUI Index is mirroring its decline from 2012-2013. After a slight buy signal from the stochastic indicator in 2012, the short-term pause was followed by another sharp drawdown. For context, after the HUI Index recorded a short-term buy signal in late 2012 – when the index’s stochastic indicator was already below the 20 level (around 10) and the index was in the process of forming the right shoulder of a huge, medium-term head-and-shoulders pattern – the index moved slightly higher, consolidated, and then fell off a cliff. Thus, the HUI Index is quite likely to decline to its 200-week moving average (or so) before pausing and recording a corrective upswing. That’s close to the 220 level. Thereafter, the index will likely continue its bearish journey and record a final medium-term low some time in December.

    Furthermore, I warned previously that the miners’ drastic underperformance of gold was an extremely bearish sign. There were several weeks when gold rallied visibly and the HUI Index actually declined modestly. Last week, we finally saw gold miners moving back up along with gold. But just like one swallow doesn’t make a summer, this move up doesn’t change the fact, that in general, performance of gold stocks has been truly terrible.

    After all, gold stocks are trading close to their previous 2021 lows, while gold is almost right in the middle between its yearly high and its yearly low.

    And why is this quote so important? Well, because the bearish implications of gold stocks’ extreme underperformance still remain intact.

    Let’s keep in mind that the drastic underperformance of the HUI Index also preceded the bloodbath in 2008 as well as in 2012 and 2013. To explain, right before the huge slide in late September and early October 2008, gold was still moving to new intraday highs; the HUI Index was ignoring that, and then it declined despite gold’s rally. However, it was also the case that the general stock market suffered materially. If stocks didn’t decline so profoundly back then, gold stocks’ underperformance relative to gold would have likely been present but more moderate.

    Nonetheless, broad head & shoulders patterns have often been precursors to monumental collapses. For example, when the HUI Index retraced a bit more than 61.8% of its downswing in 2008 and in between 50% and 61.8% of its downswing in 2012 before eventually rolling over, in both (2008 and 2012) cases, the final top – the right shoulder – formed close to the price where the left shoulder topped. And in early 2020, the left shoulder topped at 303.02. Thus, three of the biggest declines in the gold mining stocks (I’m using the HUI Index as a proxy here) all started with broad, multi-month head-and-shoulders patterns. And in all three cases, the size of the declines exceeded the size of the head of the pattern. As a reminder, the HUI Index recently completed the same formation.

    Yes, the HUI Index moved back below the previous lows and the neck level of the formation, which – at face value – means that the formation was invalidated, but we saw a similar “invalidation” in 2000 and in 2013. And then, the decline followed anyway. Consequently, I don’t think that taking the recent move higher at its face value is appropriate. It seems to me that the analogies to the very similar situation from the past are more important.

    As a result, we’re confronted with two bearish scenarios:

    1. If things develop as they did in 2000 and 2012-2013, gold stocks are likely to bottom close to their early-2020 low.
    2. If things develop like in 2008 (which might be the case, given the extremely high participation of the investment public in the stock market and other markets), gold stocks could re-test (or break slightly below) their 2016 low.

    In both cases, the forecast for silver, gold, and mining stocks is extremely bearish for the next several months.

    GDX and GDXJ Comparison

    For even more confirmation, let’s compare the behavior of the GDX ETF and the GDXJ ETF. Regarding the former, the senior miners (GDX) also rallied above the neckline of their bearish H&S pattern. And while Friday’s (Aug. 27) euphoria occurred on high volume, prior volume spikes in buying sentiment actually marked four peaks (or close to) within the last 12 months. Thus, while the bullish bids may push the GDX ETF slightly higher in the near term, history implies that investors’ excitement often does more harm than good.

    Please see below:

    In all 4 out of previous 4 cases, the spike-high volume during GDX’s upswing meant a great shorting opportunity.

    Meanwhile, the junior miners (GDXJ) didn’t invalidate the breakdown below the neckline of their bearish H&S pattern; and Friday’s close still left the GDXJ ETF below its previous lows. Moreover, while the juniors’ future direction following volume spikes isn’t quite as clear as it is with the GDX ETF, more often than not, euphoric spikes are followed by medium-term declines.

    Please see below:

    As further evidence, if you analyze the GDXJ ETF’s four-hour chart below, you can see that historical volume spikes (marked by the red vertical dashed lines) nearly always coincide with short-term peaks. As a result, Friday’s rally was more of an event driven surge – courtesy of Powell – and it’s unlikely to disrupt the GDXJ ETF’s medium-term downtrend.

    Finally, while the GDXJ/GDX ratio moved slightly higher last week, its downtrend also remains intact. For one, when the ratio’s RSI jumped above 50 three times in 2021, it coincided with short-term peaks in gold. Second, the trend in the ratio this year has been clearly down, and there’s no sign of a reversal, especially when you consider that the ratio broke below its 2019 support (which served as resistance in mid-2020). When the same thing happened in 2020, the ratio then spiked even below 1.

    Please see below:

    The Bottom Line?

    If the ratio is likely to continue its decline, then on a short-term basis we can expect it to decline to 1.27 or so. If the general stock market plunges, the ratio could move even lower, but let’s assume that stocks decline moderately (just as they did in the last couple of days) or that they do nothing or rally slightly. They’ve done all the above recently, so it’s natural to expect that this will be the case. Consequently, the trend in the GDXJ to GDX ratio would also be likely to continue, and thus expecting a move to about 1.26 - 1.27 seems rational.

    If the GDX is about to decline to approximately $28 before correcting, then we might expect the GDXJ to decline to about $28 x 1.27 = $35.56 or $28 x 1.26 = $35.28. In other words, $28 in the GDX is likely to correspond to about $35 in the GDXJ.

    Is there any technical support around $35 that would be likely to stop the decline? Yes. It’s provided by the late-Feb. 2020 low ($34.70) and the late-March high ($34.84). There’s also the late-April low at $35.63. Conservatively, I’m going to place the profit-take level just above the latter.

    Consequently, it seems that expecting the GDXJ to decline to about $35 is justified from the technical point of view as well.

    In conclusion, investors showcased their sweet tooth for gold, silver, and mining stocks on Aug. 27. However, with the USD Index hovering near two key support levels and the yellow metal confronting its second triangle-vertex-based reversal point, the taste may turn bitter over the medium term. Moreover, with prior upswings underwritten by the Fed resulting in lower lows soon after, the precious metals’ bullish behavior is nothing new. As a result, their prior weakness will likely persist before reliable bottoms emerge later this year.

    Thank you for reading our free analysis today. Please note that the above is just a small fraction of the full analyses that our subscribers enjoy on a regular basis. They include multiple premium details such as the interim target for gold that could be reached in the next few weeks. We invite you to subscribe now and read today’s issue right away.

    Sincerely,
    Przemyslaw Radomski, CFA
    Founder, Editor-in-chief

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