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Premium daily stock trading service. In our Stock Trading Alerts, we provide extensive analyses and comments at least 1 time per trading day, usually before the opening bell. The analyses focus on all the key factors essential to determining the medium- and short-term outlook for the S&P 500 futures, spanning over several time frames, credit markets and S&P 500 sectors and ratios. They also capture the key fundamental developments, events and trends in assessing the prospects and health of the S&P 500 moves. This way, you’re kept up-to-date on important developments that far too many investors are apt to miss or underestimate.

Whether you're looking for objective analyses to broaden your horizon / add confidence to trading decisions, or want to get inspired by our trade calls for S&P 500 futures, Stock Trading Alerts are the way to go.

  • Got Bond Concerns?

    February 17, 2021, 9:07 AM

    The market largely continued last week’s mixed moves, with the S&P and Nasdaq mildly retreating from record highs and the Dow eking out another record close.

    The sentiment remains mostly rosy thanks to earnings that continue to impress, plummeting virus numbers worldwide, indicators that the economic recovery is gaining steam, and imminent stimulus.

    But we’re not out of the woods yet, and I still worry about complacency and valuations.

    But now, you can add one more concern to the list- rising bond yields.

    On Tuesday (Feb. 16), the 10-year Treasury yield jumped 9 basis points to top 1.30% for the first time since February 2020. The 30-year rate also hit its highest level in a year.

    Why is this concerning?

    Rising interest rates=less attractive stocks.

    Sure, the banks benefit. But what do you think this means for growth sectors such as tech that have benefited from low-rates?

    You couple that with the fact that according to the Buffet Indicator (Total US stock market valuation/GDP), the market could be 228% overvalued, and tech stocks may be at valuations not seen since the dotcom bubble? Genuine concerns.

    A rebound in rates could also put a dent in the economic recovery if both companies and consumers find it increasingly expensive to borrow.

    While I don’t foresee a crash like we saw last March and feel that the wheels are in motion for a healthy 2021, I still maintain that some correction before the end of Q1 could happen.

    Bank of America also echoed this statement and said last week that “We expect a buyable 5-10% Q1 correction as the big ‘unknowns’ coincide with exuberant positioning, record equity supply, and ‘as good as it gets’ earnings revisions.”

    Corrections are healthy and normal market behavior, and we are long overdue for one. They are also way more common than most realize. Only twice in the last 38 years have we had years WITHOUT a correction (1995 and 2017).

    A correction could also be an excellent buying opportunity for what could be a great second half of the year.

    My goal for these updates is to educate you, give you ideas, and help you manage money like I did when I was pressing the buy and sell buttons for $600+ million in assets. I left that career to pursue one to help people who needed help instead of the ultra-high net worth.

    With that said, to sum it up:

    While there is long-term optimism, there are short-term concerns. A short-term correction between now and the end of Q1 2021 is possible. I don’t think that a decline above ~20%, leading to a bear market, will happen.

    Hopefully, you find my insights enlightening. I welcome your thoughts and questions and wish you the best of luck.

    The Streaky S&P Is Back at a Record

    Figure 1- S&P 500 Large Cap Index $SPX

    The S&P continues to trade as a streaky index. It seemingly rips off multiple-day winning streaks or losing streaks weekly.

    Before Tuesday’s (Feb. 16) “decline” (if you can call it that), here’s how the S&P has traded in February. It kicked off the month by ripping off a streak of gains in 6 of 7 days. It then promptly went on a 3-day losing streak, followed by a two-day winning streak and more record closes.

    Then it declined a 0.06% to kick off the President’s Day shortened trading week.

    More than 80% of S&P stocks that have reported earnings have beaten estimates, which is quite impressive. Yes, the forward P/E ratio is historically high. However, this P/E ratio has coincided with growing earnings.

    With the index also up 5.9% month-to-date and a healthy outlook for the second half of the year, we could have some more room to run.

    While the S&P’s RSI is still hovering around overbought levels, it’s remained stable at a HOLD level, mainly reflecting its muted moves over the last week and change.

    A short-term correction could inevitably occur by the end of Q1 2021, but for now, I am sticking with the S&P as a HOLD.

    For an ETF that attempts to directly correlate with the performance of the S&P, the SPDR S&P ETF (SPY) is a good option.

    For more of my thoughts on the market, such as red-hot small-caps and emerging market opportunities, sign up for my premium analysis today.

    Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. If you would like to receive daily premium follow-ups, I encourage you to sign up for my Stock Trading Alerts to also benefit from the trading action described - the moment it happens. The full analysis includes more details about current positions and levels to watch before deciding to open any new ones or where to close existing ones.

    Thank you.

    Matthew Levy, CFA
    Stock Trading Strategist

  • A Sleepy Week for the Indices?

    February 12, 2021, 9:13 AM

    For once, we have a week in 2021 where the market really didn't move all that much.

    Except for weed stocks that whipsawed GameStock-like and Bitcoin and Dogecoin making waves thanks to Lord Elon, it's really been kind of a boring week for the major indices.

    The S&P and Nasdaq closed at another record high Thursday (Feb. 11), while the Dow barely retreated from its own record high. The red-hot Russell has lagged this week.

    However, it’s all relative. No index has moved upwards or downwards more than about 0.30% week-to-date.

    It’s about time we had a week of relative quiet in the market.

    The sentiment is indeed still rosy right now. The economic recovery appears to be gaining steam, and the Q1 GDP decline everyone predicted might not be as sharp as we anticipated. We could also be days away from trillions of dollars of much-needed stimulus getting pumped into the economy.

    Earnings continue to impress, too, and are on pace to rise by over 20% in 2021. Since 1980, only 12 years have earnings increased by 15% or more. Except for 2018, the market gained an average of 12% in all of those years.

    We could also days away from FDA approval of a one-dose vaccine from Johnson and Johnson (JNJ).

    The COVID numbers and vaccine trend could truly turn the tide of things. More people in the U.S. have now been vaccinated than total cases, and the week kicked off (Feb. 8) with vaccine doses outnumbering new cases 10-1. Dr. Fauci also claims that vaccines could be available to the general public by April.

    But we're not out of the woods yet. Sure this week has been calm.

    But it’s almost been “too calm.”

    I still worry about complacency, valuations, and the return of inflation.

    “You wouldn’t know it from the sedate action in the averages,” but Wall Street is on “a highway to the danger zone,” CNBC’s Jim Cramer said.

    “In a frothy market, stocks will have enormous rallies that are totally disconnected from the underlying fundamentals.”

    He’s not wrong.

    Look at the Buffett Indicator as of February 4. Where I track this indicator usually updates once a week and shows the total U.S. stock market valuation to the GDP.

    If you take the US stock market cap of $48.7 trillion and the estimated GDP of $21.7 trillion, we're nearly 224% overvalued and 84% above the historical average. This ratio has not been at a level like this since the dotcom bubble.

    Worse? This chart was dated February 4. The market’s only risen since then.

    This is what I mean by don’t be fooled by the relative calm of this week.

    The S&P 500’s forward 12-month P/E ratio is also well above its 10-year average of 15.8. The Russell 2000 is also back at a historic high above its 200-day moving average. Tech stock valuations are again approaching dotcom bust levels.

    Still not sold? Look at Goldman’s non-profitable tech index. It’s approaching an absurd 250% year-over-year performance.

    Bank of America also believes that a market correction could be on the horizon due to signs of overheating.

    While I don’t foresee a crash like we saw last March, I still maintain that some correction before the end of Q1 could happen.

    Corrections are healthy and normal market behavior, and we are long overdue for one. They are also way more common than most realize. Only twice in the last 38 years have we had years WITHOUT a correction (1995 and 2017).

    A correction could also be an excellent buying opportunity for what could be a great second half of the year.

    Bank of America also echoed this statement and said that “We expect a buyable 5-10% Q1 correction as the big ‘unknowns’ coincide with exuberant positioning, record equity supply, and ‘as good as it gets’ earnings revisions.”

    The key word here- buyable.

    My goal for these updates is to educate you, give you ideas, and help you manage money like I did when I was pressing the buy and sell buttons for $600+ million in assets. I left that career to pursue one where I could help people who needed help, instead of the ultra-high net worth.

    With that said, to sum it up:

    While there is long-term optimism, there are short-term concerns. A short-term correction between now and the end of Q1 2021 is possible. I don't think that a decline above ~20%, leading to a bear market will happen.

    Hopefully, you find my insights enlightening. I welcome your thoughts and questions and wish you the best of luck.

    The Streaky S&P Is Back at a Record

    Figure 1- S&P 500 Large Cap Index $SPX

    The S&P continues to trade as a streaky index. It seemingly rips off multiple-day winning streaks or losing streaks weekly.

    After the S&P 500 ripped off a streak of gains in 6 of 7 days, it promptly went on a 3-day losing streak, followed by another record close.

    I would hardly call that a 3-day losing streak, though. I’d even say it was a boring week for the S&P 500 with muted moves.

    The outlook is healthy, though, especially when you consider earnings. More than 80% of S&P stocks that have reported earnings thus far have beaten estimates.

    What could be on tap for next week? Who even knows anymore. But if earnings keep on outperforming, and the sentiment remains stable, it could be another strong week.

    The S&P’s RSI is ticking up towards overbought. However, because it’s still below 70, and because of the streaky manner in which the index has traded, it remains a HOLD.

    A short-term correction could inevitably occur by the end of Q1 2021, but for now, I am sticking with the S&P as a HOLD.

    For an ETF that attempts to directly correlate with the performance of the S&P, the SPDR S&P ETF (SPY) is a good option.

    For more of my thoughts on the market, such as red-hot small-caps and emerging market opportunities, sign up for my premium analysis today.

    Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. If you would like to receive daily premium follow-ups, I encourage you to sign up for my Stock Trading Alerts to also benefit from the trading action described - the moment it happens. The full analysis includes more details about current positions and levels to watch before deciding to open any new ones or where to close existing ones.

    Thank you.

    Matthew Levy, CFA
    Stock Trading Strategist

  • That Wasn’t Much of a Down Day...

    February 10, 2021, 9:24 AM

    Technically, the Dow and S&P snapped their 7-day winning streak.

    Technically.

    I hardly consider a decline of 0.03% and 0.11% for the Dow and S&P, respectively, a down day.

    Meanwhile, the Nasdaq and Russell saw a record close for who knows how many consecutive days.

    Can the market keep this up? Who even knows anymore. Everything seems to defy expectations and logic. Yeah, it's possible. But I'd be surprised if we don't see at least one sharp pullback before the end of the week.

    The sentiment is surely rosy right now. The economic recovery appears to be gaining steam, and the Q1 decline everyone predicted might not be as swift as we anticipated- if at all. President Biden's stimulus could officially pass within days as well and provide much-needed relief to struggling businesses and families.

    Have you seen the vaccine numbers lately, too? More people in the U.S. have now been vaccinated than total cases. On Monday (Feb. 8), vaccine doses outnumbered new cases 10-1. New daily COVID cases have also reached their lowest levels since October.

    With Johnson and Johnson's (JNJ) one dose vaccine candidate seemingly days away from FDA approval, the outlook is certainly more positive at this point than many anticipated.

    But we're not out of the woods yet, and three non-pandemic related factors still concern me- complacency, overvaluation, and inflation.

    Jim Cramer's "Seven Deadly Sins" from Mad Money Monday night (Feb. 8) reflect many of my concerns too:

    Source: CNBC

    Yes, I know I keep saying to beware. I also know that earnings are on pace to rise by over 20% in 2021. Since 1980, only 12 years have earnings increased by 15% or more. Except for 2018, the market gained an average of 12% in all of those years.

    But consider some valuation metrics that scream “bubble.”

    As of February 4, 2021, the Buffett Indicator, or the ratio of the total US stock market valuation to the GDP, was at a level not seen since the dotcom bubble. If you take the US stock market cap of $48.7 trillion and the estimated GDP of $21.7 trillion, we're nearly 224% overvalued and 84% above the historical average.

    Keep in mind; this chart was dated February 4. This number has only grown since then. Tuesday (Feb. 9) was hardly a down day. If anything, it was plain dull.

    Fears of a bubble are genuine. The S&P 500’s forward 12-month P/E ratio is back to above 22 and well above the 10-year average of 15.8. The Russell 2000 is also back at a historic high above its 200-day moving average. Tech stock valuations are again approaching dot-com bust levels.

    Bank of America also believes that a market correction could be on the horizon due to signs of overheating.

    While I don’t foresee a crash like we saw last March, I still maintain that some correction before the end of Q1 could happen.

    Corrections are healthy and normal market behavior, and we are long overdue for one. They are also way more common than most realize. Only twice in the last 38 years have we had years WITHOUT a correction (1995 and 2017).

    A correction could also be an excellent buying opportunity for what could be a great second half of the year.

    Bank of America also echoed this statement and said that “We expect a buyable 5-10% Q1 correction as the big ‘unknowns’ coincide with exuberant positioning, record equity supply, and ‘as good as it gets’ earnings revisions.”

    The key word here- buyable.

    My goal for these updates is to educate you, give you ideas, and help you manage money like I did when I was pressing the buy and sell buttons for $600+ million in assets. I left that career to pursue one where I could help people who needed help, instead of the ultra-high net worth.

    With that said, to sum it up:

    While there is long-term optimism, there are short-term concerns. A short-term correction between now and the end of Q1 2021 is possible. I don't think that a decline above ~20%, leading to a bear market will happen.

    Hopefully, you find my insights enlightening. I welcome your thoughts and questions and wish you the best of luck.

    Small-Caps are Officially Overbought

    Figure 1- iShares Russell 2000 ETF (IWM)

    This pains me to write this because I love Russell 2000 small-cap index in 2021.

    But this is getting ridiculous now.

    As tracked by the iShares Russell 2000 ETF (IWM), small-cap stocks have been on a rampage since November. Since the close on October 30, the IWM has gained nearly 50% and more than doubled ETFs' returns tracking the larger indices. What happened to the Nasdaq being red hot? This chart makes it look like an igloo.

    Since the close on January 29, the Russell has done just about the same again and gained 11.10%. It’s outperformed all the other major indices by a minimum of 5% in that period.

    Not to mention, year-to-date, it’s already up a staggering 18%.

    Small-caps are funny. They either outperform and underperform and can be swayed easily by the news. I foresaw the pullback two weeks ago coming for over a month, and unfortunately, I see the same thing happening now. But only for the short-term.

    I remain bullish due to aggressive stimulus, which could be put in motion this week.

    I also love small-cap stocks for the long-term, especially as the world reopens and this Biden agenda gets put in motion. It seems like things are finally trending in the right direction.

    For now, though, the index is once again overbought.

    The RSI is at a scorching 75, and I can't justify calling this a BUY or HOLD right now. It's an excellent time to take profits.

    SELL and take profits. If and when there is a deeper pullback, BUY for the long-term recovery.

    Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. If you would like to receive daily premium follow-ups, I encourage you to sign up for my Stock Trading Alerts to also benefit from the trading action described - the moment it happens. The full analysis includes more details about current positions and levels to watch before deciding to open any new ones or where to close existing ones.

    Thank you.

    Matthew Levy, CFA
    Stock Trading Strategist

  • Will Stocks Be Brady or Mahomes?

    February 8, 2021, 9:24 AM

    One week, Reddit bandits take on hedge funds and win, pumping up stocks like GameStop and AMC while the broader market sees its worst decline since October.

    What a difference a week can make.

    The indices then see their most significant gains the next week since Joe Biden's election victory and don't see a down day all week.

    Now we're here- still amid a tug of war between sentiments. For now, though, things are looking rosy. That is, of course, unless you're Patrick Mahomes this morning.

    Can the market keep up it’s winning streak this week? It’s possible. But I’d be surprised if we don’t see at least one sharp pullback before this Friday (Feb. 12).

    Can the market keep up its winning streak this week? It's possible. But I'd be surprised if we don't see at least one sharp pullback this week.

    Despite tailwinds moving the markets right now, such as stimulus progress, an ever-improving vaccine delivery, the possibility of an effective one-dose vaccine from Johnson and Johnson (JNJ), falling COVID numbers, and an improving economic outlook based on consistently falling jobless claims and corporate earnings that continue to crush, I want you to be wary of complacency and overvaluation.

    Yes, I know I keep saying this. I also know that earnings are on pace to rise by over 20% in 2021. Since 1980, only 12 years have earnings increased by 15% or more. Except for 2018, the market gained an average of 12% in all of those years.

    But consider some valuation metrics that scream “bubble.”

    As of February 4, 2021, the Buffett Indicator, or the ratio of the total US stock market valuation to the GDP, was at a level not seen since the dotcom bubble. If you take the US stock market cap of $48.7 trillion and the estimated GDP of $21.7 trillion, we're nearly 224% overvalued and 84% above the historical average.

    With the S&P 500, Nasdaq, and Russell 2000 all currently trading at record closes, fears of a bubble are genuine. The S&P 500’s forward 12-month P/E ratio is back to above 22 and well above the 10-year average of 15.8. The Russell 2000 is also back at a historic high above its 200-day moving average. Tech stock valuations are also approaching dot-com bust levels.

    Yes, the outlook is healthy and for good reason. According to a recent Bank of America survey of 194 money managers, bullishness on stocks is at a three-year high, and the average share of cash in portfolios, a sign of protection from market turmoil, is at its lowest level since May 2013.

    But always remember that when the market gets what it expects, and we’re expecting strength by mid-year, it’s usually a time to sell rather than buy.

    While I don’t foresee a crash like we saw last March, I still maintain that some correction before the end of Q1 could happen.

    Corrections are healthy and normal market behavior, and we are long overdue for one. They are also way more common than most realize. Only twice in the last 38 years have we had years WITHOUT a correction (1995 and 2017).

    A correction could also be an excellent buying opportunity for what could be a great second half of the year.

    My goal for these updates is to educate you, give you ideas, and help you manage money like I did when I was pressing the buy and sell buttons for $600+ million in assets. I left that career to pursue one where I could help people who needed help, instead of the ultra-high net worth.

    With that said, to sum it up:

    While there is long-term optimism, there are short-term concerns. A short-term correction between now and the end of Q1 2021 is possible. I don't think that a decline above ~20%, leading to a bear market will happen.

    Hopefully, you find my insights enlightening. I welcome your thoughts and questions and wish you the best of luck.

    How Frothy is Tech Again?

    Figure 1- Nasdaq Composite Index $COMP

    I remain bullish on tech. Its earnings continue to defy expectations with stocks like Amazon, Alphabet, PayPal, and eBay all crushing estimates last week. I’m also especially bullish on subsectors such as cloud computing, e-commerce, and fintech for 2021.

    But please monitor the RSI.

    The Nasdaq is opening the week at another record high and is continuing to show strength. But there are clear echoes of the dotcom bubble 20-years ago, and the index has been trading in an RSI-based pattern.

    Let’s break down the Nasdaq since December and how it has reacted whenever the RSI has exceeded 70.

    December 9- exceeded an RSI of 70 and briefly pulled back.

    January 4- exceeded a 70 RSI just before the new year, and declined 1.47%.

    January 11- declined by 1.45% after exceeding a 70 RSI.

    Week of January 25- Exceeded an RSI of over 73 before the week, and declined 4.13% for the week.

    Every single time the RSI exceeded 70, I switched my Nasdaq call to a SELL.

    Why?

    The Nasdaq is trading in a precise pattern.

    The RSI is at around 67.50 so I’m not ready to switch my call again. But I am a bit concerned. Tech valuations, especially the tech IPO market, terrify me. SPACs don’t help either.

    The ratio of market value to total revenues has also not been this high since the dotcom bust.

    I still like tech and am bullish for 2021. But for now, I'm going to stay conservative and say HOLD while monitoring the RSI.

    For an ETF that attempts to directly correlate with the performance of the NASDAQ, the Invesco QQQ ETF (QQQ) is a good option.

    Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. If you would like to receive daily premium follow-ups, I encourage you to sign up for my Stock Trading Alerts to also benefit from the trading action described - the moment it happens. The full analysis includes more details about current positions and levels to watch before deciding to open any new ones or where to close existing ones.

    Thank you.

    Matthew Levy, CFA
    Stock Trading Strategist

  • Bulls on Stock Parade

    February 5, 2021, 9:09 AM

    Is this week, dare I say, the first "normal" week of 2021? Let’s take a look at what has happened in January so far in what is supposed to be a more prosperous year than 2020.

    Six days into 2021, the Capitol saw its first insurrection since 1814.

    Two weeks later, we inaugurated a new president.

    A week later, we saw class warfare before our eyes when Redditors from the "WallStreetBets" subreddit took on hedge funds and won.

    After declining in two of the last four weeks, the indices haven't seen a single down day all week. If Friday (Feb. 5) futures stay the same, we might not have a down day all week.

    Bulls on parade.

    Good morning investors, thanks for finally caring about strong earnings and not paying attention to GameStop (GME) (that was fun while it lasted, though).

    The sentiment is rosey and for good reason. Earnings continue to crush. Some form of President Biden’s aggressive stimulus could also pass within days. Jobless claims fell for the third consecutive week and hit the lowest level since the end of November, labor market data looks strong, vaccines hit a record daily total on Thursday (Feb. 4) and could be distributed at CVS and Walgreens within days, and the 5-to-30 year treasury curve was the highest its been since March 2016.

    Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) also just applied to the FDA for emergency use authorization for its one-dose vaccine. If approved, it could be game-changing.

    Happy days.

    My overheating and trading concerns in an overbought market remain, though, and have returned with a vengeance. I liked where many sectors and indices ended last week for potential BUY opportunities. This blazing win streak, though, is teetering on the edge of mania and overvaluation again.

    The S&P 500, Nasdaq, and Russell 2000 hit new record closes yet again.

    Are we in a bubble? Maybe.

    I worry about complacency and overvaluation.

    The S&P 500’s forward 12-month P/E ratio is back to nearly 22 and well above the 10-year average of 15.8. The Russell 2000 is also back at a historic high above its 200-day moving average. Tech stock valuations are even approaching dot-com bust levels, once again.

    According to a recent Bank of America survey of 194 money managers, bullishness on stocks is at a three-year high, and the average share of cash in portfolios, which is usually a sign of protection from market turmoil, is at the lowest level since May 2013.

    The market needed last week’s pullback, but it was nothing but a minor cooldown period thanks to Reddit in the grand scheme of things.

    We are long overdue for a correction. Corrections are healthy for markets and more common than most realize. Only twice in the last 38 years have we had years WITHOUT a correction (1995 and 2017).

    Well, hello, we haven’t seen one since last March!

    A correction could also be an excellent buying opportunity for what should be a great second half of the year.

    My goal for these updates is to educate you, give you ideas, and help you manage money like I did when I was pressing the buy and sell buttons for $600+ million in assets. I left that career to pursue one where I could help people who needed help, instead of the ultra-high net worth.

    With that said, to sum it up:

    While there is long-term optimism, there are short-term concerns. A short-term correction between now and the end of Q1 2021 is possible. I don't think that a decline above ~20%, leading to a bear market will happen.

    Hopefully, you find my insights enlightening. I welcome your thoughts and questions and wish you the best of luck.

    Four Days in a Row and Counting for the S&P 500...

    Figure 1- S&P 500 Large Cap Index $SPX

    Have you ever rooted so hard for a team that can frustrate and excite you at the same time? Rip off a 4-day winning streak, followed by a slump of losing 5 out of 6 games, then come back with another winning streak? Does it have you questioning if the team is outstanding or a mirage?

    If I could compare the S&P 500 to a team, it would probably be the Philadelphia 76ers.

    This index looks like a winner and seemingly rips off multiple-day winning streaks weekly. Now and then, though, it can show inconsistency, make you scratch your head, and go on a frustrating losing streak.

    Two weeks ago, the S&P was hovering around a record-high. Its forward P/E ratio was the highest since the dot-com bust, and the RSI consistently approached overbought levels.

    By the end of last week, it was nearly oversold.

    Now, this week? Its RSI is back above 60, we’re at another record high, we’re on a four-day winning streak (which could be five if futures remain in the green), and we’re at a forward 12-month P/E ratio at nearly 22 and well above the 10-year average of 15.8.

    I said before that once the S&P approaches a 3600-level, we can start talking about it as a BUY. Well, the index came pretty darn close to it last week, but it wasn’t enough for me. Despite this week’s rally, short-term concerns remain, with long-term optimism.

    To me, because of the RSI and how the index has traded, it remains a HOLD. But we’re teet

    A short-term correction could inevitably occur by the end of Q1 2021, but for now, I am sticking with the S&P as a HOLD.

    For an ETF that attempts to directly correlate with the performance of the S&P, the SPDR S&P ETF (SPY) is a good option.

    Thank you for reading today’s free analysis. If you would like to receive daily premium follow-ups, I encourage you to sign up for my Stock Trading Alerts to also benefit from the trading action described - the moment it happens. The full analysis includes more details about current positions and levels to watch before deciding to open any new ones or where to close existing ones.

    Thank you.

    Matthew Levy, CFA
    Stock Trading Strategist

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